Introduction

The Design and Technology Department at Stretford Grammar School is a committed and well established team, who enjoy inspiring students to achieve in this highly challenging subject. We aim to produce stimulating contexts, and a range of opportunities for students to use their intellectual and practical skills to think of creative ways to solve real life and relevant problems.

Students acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. They are also taught to consider aesthetic, technical, cultural, health, social, emotional, economic, industrial and environmental issues when designing. Students learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present day technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world.  Ultimately it is our aim that students of Design and Technology will in the future make an important contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation

Meet the team:

Mrs H. Barry Curriculum Leader for Design and Technology
Miss G. Sutcliffe Teacher of Design and Technology
Mr. D. Price-Uden Teacher of Design and Technology / Assistant Headteacher

 Enrichment:

The department is keen to involve students in competitions outside school such as the regional Crest Awards and Teen Tech competition as well as the Junior Chef competition in conjunction with Trafford College. Trips out include visits to companies such as Land Rover Jaguar and Siemens and Key stage 4 and 5 students are taken to Llandudno to see the “Innovations” exhibition and attend workshops run by the Examination Board. After school students can join in with activities such “Let’s Get Cooking”.

 What will be taught?

In Design and Technology students combine practical and technological skills with creative thinking to design and make products to meet human needs.

At Key Stage Three students are taught in groups of 16 and they spend around nine weeks in each of the focus areas: Electronic Products and Product Design; Food Technology; Textiles Technology and Graphic Design. There is no examination in this subject, however work is continually assessed and students will assemble a portfolio of their marked work as evidence of their progress throughout the three years of this key stage.

Students learn by responding creatively to a given brief and will generate ideas using information gathered from various sources. They will be expected to take users’ views and any constraints into account. Students will produce step by step plans for their own making and will communicate their designs through words, drawings and models (including computer generated models). Students will work with a variety of materials to produce high quality outcomes. Finally, students will evaluate their designs and products to decide what is working well and what could be improved.

Key stage 3:

  Electronic Products and Product Design Food Technology Textiles Technology Graphic Design
Year 7 Garden Centre promotional product -a moisture sensor and pewter casting designs for a free gift for a magazine Students will learn about Healthy Eating and Food Safety and design and make food products for a healthy packed meal. The students will be introduced to textiles and textile equipment and will design and make a colourful “Pugli” character. Which will reflect  microscopic bacteria,fungi and viruses Technical drawing. Students will learn the tools of Graphic Design and develop their 2D and 3D drawing skills
Year 8 Electronic DiceStudents will design and make the electronic hardware for this device and develop the casing using CAD/CAM and the laser cutter Students will explore and make foods from many different countries and they will design and make a meal from a country of their choice for a school canteen. The students will have the task of creating a pop art/ abstract inspired fabric portrait based on themselves and their identity. Students will take inspiration from the work of artists.

 

 3rd angle orthographic drawing and understanding how structures work in order to   design, model and test a range of simple and complex structures.
Year 9 Clock Project a design and make project using a wide range of potential materials, tools and processes. Students will learn about the commercial manufacture of food products and will develop their knowledge of nutrition and special dietary needs to make a range of food products. Students will explore the environmental impact of their designs and make a fashion item from recycled materials with a strong British cultural theme. Computer Aided Graphic Design. Using Adobe Photoshop and desk top publishing to develop promotional material for the fragrance industry.

 Key stage 4

Design and Technology: Food Technology

Course Overview

GCSE Food Technology builds on Key Stage 3 work and enables candidates to demonstrate their creativity, with the making of food products a central feature of this course.

You will study:

  • The functional and nutritional properties of food
  • The effects of combining different ingredients and the interaction of foods during preparation and cooking
  • The importance of appropriate proportions on the structure, shape and volume of mixtures
  • The effects of acids and alkalis
  • The design process including the development of a product prototype
  • Labelling, packaging and product information and codes of practice
  • Social, economic, cultural and environmental considerations
  • The use, need and effect of additives
  • The use of different types of equipment to produce food items of quality
  • Storage of food and food products
  • Manufacturing/large scale production methods
  • Technological developments in food production

 

GCSE Design and Technology: Food Technology:  Full Course (AQA)
Assessment:  1 examination paper (2 hours):  40% of the final gradeCoursework:  1 controlled assessment task (45 hours):  60% of the final grade
Unit 1:  Written Paper – 2 hoursStudents answer all of the questions in two sections.

A pre-release preparation sheet is issued for section A which is a design question (30 marks).

Section B covers the rest of the specification (90 marks):

  • Materials and components
  • Design and market influences
  • Processes and manufacture
Unit 2:  Design and making Practice (controlled assessment task) – 45 hoursConsists of a single design and make activity (worth 90 marks):

  • Investigating the design opportunity
  • Development of the design proposals
  • Making
  • Testing and Evaluation
  • Communication

 

What can I do after I have completed the course?

A Design and Technology subject such as Food Technology gives you the opportunity to demonstrate that you can manage a project from concept to completion.

You will develop your creativity, practical ability and thinking skills.

It is also an excellent preparation for A level Design and Technology and degree courses leading on to careers such as  Dietetics, Food Science, Product Design and Consumer Science.

Design and Technology: Electronic Products

Course Overview

You will produce products and design folders and be examined on your knowledge and understanding in your chosen area.  The products and folders will be more sophisticated than the Key Stage 3 projects.

You will study:

  • Materials and components
  • Production processes
  • Industrial processes
  • Social, moral, ethical and environmental issues of product design
  • Product analysis
  • Designing and making processes

You will then apply this knowledge and understanding when making a product and a portfolio of design work.

What skills might I develop?

The course places an emphasis on the design and manufacture of quality products.  You will be required to look at commercial products and forms opinions as to their ability to satisfy consumer needs.  The making process allows you to explore a variety of traditional and modern manufacturing techniques.  It develops your understanding of the working properties of a range of materials.

GCSE Design and Technology: Electronic Products:  Full Course (AQA)
Assessment:  1 examination paper (2 hours):  40% of the final gradeCoursework:  1 controlled assessment task (45 hours):  60% of the final grade
Unit 1:  Written Paper – 2 hoursStudents answer all of the questions in two sections.

A pre-release preparation sheet is issued for section A which is a design question (30 marks).

Section B covers the rest of the specification (90 marks):

  • Materials and components
  • Design and market influences
  • Processes and manufacture
Unit 2:  Design and making Practice (controlled assessment task) Typical project titles may include designing and making

  • A sound activated light
  • A electronic dice for a game
  • A guitar tuning device
  • A burglar alarm
  • An electronic organ

 

What can I do after I have finished the course?

A Design and Technology subject such as Electronic Products gives you the opportunity to demonstrate that you can manage a project from concept to completion.

The subject compliments study in other GCSE subjects such as Mathematics and Physics.  You will develop your creativity, practical ability and cognitive skills, giving a foundation for A Level Product Design and further study at degree level in Engineering, Physics or Product Design.

 Key stage 5

This course offers a unique opportunity for candidates to develop their capacity for imaginative, innovative thinking, creativity and independence. Problem solving and organisation skills are developed by designing and making products in a wide range of contexts relating to personal interests. Knowledge, understanding and skills covered at GCSE level are extended with greater emphasis placed on exploring the wider context of society and the environment, and on the relationship between designer, manufacturer and user in the world in which we live.

SUBJECT CONTENT

 This course specifically aims to provide opportunities for candidates to gain a very broad understanding of Design and Technology, and encourages them to develop critical thinking and interdisciplinary skills. It enables us to offer a variety of teaching and learning routes and to encourage students to explore a flexible approach to the course, which suits their individual interests and experience

This course is suitable for anyone considering further study or a career in a design or engineering field or architecture. It is also for students who wish to broaden their post 16 studies and gain a fuller understanding of the world in which we live and to develop as discerning consumers able to make informed choices.

This course is a vehicle for developing and demonstrating key skills which will prove useful and transferable to their main area of study. These include analysis, problem solving, project management, ICT and manual dexterity.

There are opportunities to integrate work-related activities into the course and form links with industry and commerce.  For example, candidates could enlist the help of the Royal Academy of Engineers or talk to a manufacturer about their design. Research may also involve trips to design museums.

Specification at a glance

Design and Technology: Product Design is equal to every other A-level and there is a large amount of theory to cover. Candidates need to have both academic and practical ability.

The AS examinations

 Unit 1 – DT1 

20% of full A level              2 hours Examination paper

This paper will contain two sections which will assess candidates’ knowledge and understanding drawn from the subject content for one focus area listed under:

4.1.1. Designing and innovation;         4.1.2 Product Analysis;

4.2.1. Materials and components;      4.2.2 Industrial and commercial practice.

Section A questions require short answers: Section B questions require open-ended essay type responses.

This component is externally assessed by the WJEC

 Unit 2 –DT2

30% of full A level  (approximately 40 hours Design and Make task)

Course work at AS begins with an in-depth analysis of an existing product or situation. This is then used as the basis for design and manufacture of a new product for an identified target audience. Candidates will submit a design folder and a sketch book together with their made outcome.

Candidates will submit one design and make task which will satisfy the AS assessment criteria.

This component is marked by the centre and moderated by the WJEC

A Level (the above plus the following A2 units)

Unit3- DT3

20% of A level       Examination paper 2hours 30 minutes.

The examination paper consists of three sections and will assess candidates’ knowledge and understanding drawn from the whole subject content of one focus area. Section A and B questions require short answers and section C questions require open-ended essay type responses and will specifically address the subject specification content listed under:

4.1.1 Designing and innovation;                  4.1.2 Product analysis;

4.1.3 Human responsibility;                         4.1.4 Public interaction;

4.2.1 Materials and Components;               4.2.2 Industrial and commercial practice;

4.2.3 Processes;                                           4.2.4 Production systems and control.

This component is externally assessed by the WJEC

Unit 4-DT4

30% of A level        Major project approximately 60 hours

Candidates will undertake a single substantial project.

Each year the WJEC will set eight themes for the project, though candidates may also submit their own proposals for approval.

The project requires candidates to demonstrate the integration of designing and making skills and knowledge and understanding.

More emphasis is placed on industrial and commercial issues at A2 with a realistic appreciation of the needs of different users, society and the environment. The work of known designers and artists is studied to provide understanding and inspiration. Candidates take an increased responsibility for organising relevant research and design work for the management of their project. A wide range of materials and techniques is available

This component is marked by the centre and moderated by the WJEC.

WHAT ARE THE ENTRY REQUIREMENTS?

Students should preferably have at least Grade B in GCSE Design and Technology.  You need to be a creative problem solver who enjoys an academic and practical challenge.

WITH WHAT OTHER SUBJECTS DOES IT FIT?

It complements Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Art and Design. It is a good contrast to English, History, Geography and Modern Languages.

 WHERE CAN SUCCESS IN THE COURSE LEAD?

This course will aid entry into many careers involving design, including product design, architecture, engineering, graphic design, fashion and textile design and interior design. It also supports related fields such as media, computer technology, electronics and any career involving analytical thinking, problem solving and creativity.