All schools are required by law to have ‘due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism’.  This is known as the Prevent duty.

In support of this schools can build students’ resilience to radicalisation by promoting British Values and enabling them to challenge extremism.  In this schools provide a safe place in which students and staff can debate controversial issues, providing people with the tools to challenge extremist arguments.

The curriculum at Stretford Grammar School whether in terms of content or the skills developed through delivery provides students with time to explore sensitive or controversial issues and equip them with the knowledge and skills to understand and manage difficult situations.

The link below will take you to an overview of the opportunities in the curriculum for students to undertake this study and develop these skills.

 

 

Prevent in the Curriculum

Area of Focus How the school curriculum supports this area of focus
Digital literacy – how does the school support students in being critical about on line material and sorting through the relevance and appropriateness of what they find on line? English – Year 7 – research techniques, using the internet, verifying details and data

Year 7 – The Breadwinner – propaganda

Year 9 – Animal Farm – propaganda

Year 10/11 – non-fiction critical reading skills; interrogating resources

Mathematics

Science – Transition projects require students to evaluate information on the internet.  At Key Stage 5 the global warming projects means students are required to evaluate the credibility of sources and the data / information they obtain.

Humanities – Critical review of sources to identify bias in certain topics in Key Stage 3 e.g. views on China in Geography

In RE lessons, pupils are given the opportunity to read through articles and other text selected from online. They then use the skills of selecting/extracting and applying appropriately.  Guidance is given for using online material e.g. Wikipedia is not an advised website and the idea of bias.  AS/A are given a suggested website list to complement their learning on the course.

Social Sciences

Business and Economics – Positive and normative statements – looking at opinions vs economic facts in the news.

Classical / Keynesian / Behavioural economic viewpoints – video link and news articles – thinking about the ideology behind the policy

Modern Foreign Languages

Computing – students investigate the reliability of what they find on the internet – with a focus on bias and the concept of persuasion versus information

Music – GCSE / A level students have to evaluate information and decide most relevant / factual relating to their areas of study and periods in history.

Art

Drama

Design Technology – Independent on line research – Product analysis and Moodboards.  Students have to find images of products to analyse or inspire their own design ideas. It is important that the images are appropriate for their target audience/theme. We discuss different features (including spiritual, moral, social and cultural elements) of products and images and how they might be suitable for  different people and/or environments. This activity is done in every project at KS3, KS4 and KS5.

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Participatory Democracy – how does the school engage students in having a say in what they learn and how they learn? English – Year 7 – researching chosen topics

All year groups – discussion / debate / writing up point of view / reading other points of view and asserting own

GCSE – writing to express a point of view is assessed content

Mathematics

Science – Student voice questionnaire allows students to have a say in they sorts of learning activities that occur in lessons, students allowed to make decisions during practical work in what variables they alter, keep the same or measure.

Humanities – Students complete a self-review for each where they feedback on what activities they enjoy most and what skills they feel they would like to develop further in Geography

In RE pupils are given the opportunity to give ideas for content and skills used through pupil voice.  The religions we chose are based on pupil intake making it relevant and appropriate.  Mature, developed discussion in lessons.

Social Sciences

Business and Economics

Modern Foreign Languages

Computing

Music – Different learning styles are used in lessons and discussed with the students at all levels – including visual, colourful, key words and picture facts.

Art

Drama

Design Technology – In every area of Key Stage 3 students create their own designs and responses to a brief. Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 are focused on student interpretation and their own ideas.

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Major World Events – in what ways does the curriculum draw upon events in the news English – Year 7 – The Holocaust (Boy in the Striped Pyjamas); Afghanistan (The Breadwinner)

Year 8 – First World War (Private Peaceful); cults / utopian societies (The Giver); UN Gender equality

Year 9 – WWII (Heroes); dictatorships (Julius Caesar, modern interpretations); communism / political dictatorship / ideologies (Animal Farm)

Year 10/11 –contemporary news articles / documentaries as sources for non-fiction study

Conflict poetry cluster: WWII, The Boer War, world conflict, Hiroshima, Irish ‘troubles’ .

Mathematics

Science – As and when applicable. Such as Hinkley power station, Earthquakes, DNA / genetics e.g. ‘baby born with 3 parents’, Floods linked to Global warming and polymers e.g. the new £5.

Humanities – Curriculum adapted to include major world events e.g. Typhoon Haiyan and EU membership referendum have been covered as a series of one off lessons in Geography in the past.

Major hazards that occur are incorporated into our lessons if they coincide with our teaching.

Geography is all about topical issues and any news stories which coincide with what we are teaching we incorporate into our lessons e.g. refugee crisis.

In RE Consistently plan lessons around events in the media e.g. terrorism, Jihad, Orlando shootings potentially linked to homosexuality.  Reflecting the increasing secular society, we look at both religious and secular viewpoints e.g. humanism, time for verbal and personal reflection is given on controversial issues.

Social Sciences

Business and Economics – Throughout the course in every topic for example, Brexit talk by the IEA on 20th October 2016; sugar tax; Universal Credit; Hurricane Matthew and its impacts on economic growth

Modern Foreign Languages

Computing

Music

Art

Drama

Design Technology – Biomimicry in design – Year 9 product design. Students look at advances in Science and Technology and how products have been inspired by nature.

PE

Beliefs and Values – in what ways does the school make use of the beliefs and values, religious or not, of students in the curriculum and in its delivery? English – Linking pupils’ own experiences to all of the texts we study through the opportunity to share own cultural experience / values / beliefs and to express opinions both in analytical writing and in creative texts: stories, anecdotes, poems, speeches.

Mathematics

Science – Discussions about Darwin / Mendel and why their ideas were only gradually accepted.  Social, Moral and Ethical issues of: Transplantation, Stem cells, uses of resources and human influences on the planet.

Humanities – Diverse nature of cohort reflected in the wide range of countries we look at KS3 – Middle East, India, China, Nigeria, Sierra Leone including government types, conflicts, culture, resource exploitation and challenging stereotypes.

In RE Everyday learning and reflection on religious, secular and personal beliefs. Lends itself well to the nature of the subject and draws on pupils to share and teach others and further challenge them.

Pupils are taught how to engage in respectful dialogue with others appropriately to reflect differing views.

Social Sciences

Business and Economics

Modern Foreign Languages

Computing

Music – Students have an input when discussing the religious element of Music e.g. in Indian / Gamelan Year 8 and Reggae Year 9.

Art

Drama

Design Technology – Multicultural foods in Year 8.  Students look at traditional and staple foods from around the world. Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural aspects of where food comes from and how it is eaten are discussed and students have the opportunity to adapt dishes from Span and Italy (paella and focaccia breads).

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Religions – how far do students encounter the teaching religion, through specific delivery, texts, music and imagery in the curriculum? English – The Breadwinner – Muslim culture,; the Taliban and extremism; gender equality

Year 7 / 8 / GCSE – charitable giving

Animal Farm – communist ideology

AIC – Christian morality

Heroes – Catholic symbolism and ideology

Key Stage 5 – The White Tiger (Indian caste system)

Key Stage 5 – Philip Roth – Judaism

Boy in the Striped Pyjamas – Judaism / holocaust / Germany 1940s

Blake and the Romantics – Christian ideologies and values

Mathematics

Science – Students draw on social views of certain groups of people or moral beliefs of some religious groups in responses to questions on evolution and uses of new medical advances.

Humanities – in RE religious teachings, study of texts are consistently studied through Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5.

Philosophy, Ethics and Religious beliefs are offered as externally accredited courses which are accessible to all students.

Social Sciences

Business and Economics

Modern Foreign Languages

Computing

Music

Art

Drama

Design Technology – Multicultural foods in Year 8. Religious diets through investigations in to cultural aspects of food.

Key Stage 4 includes an investigation of food allergies and intolerances as well as a specific focus on religious dietary requirements.

PE

Personal Health – how does the school address issues relating to personal health and well-being in the curriculum? English – Breadwinner – vitamin D deficiency, exercise, growing up safe and well

Boy in the Striped Pyjamas – hunger, friendship, trust, secrecy

Heroes – physical disability and courage, suicidal thoughts

Private Peaceful – love, friendship, courage, loyalty

An Inspector Calls – moral integrity

Julius Caesar / Animal Farm – the importance of education and knowledge

Mathematics

Science

Humanities – Year 9 consider indicators of development including factors that can lead to a high quality of life and the happiness index, where they consider why happiness does not always correlate with wealth in Geography

Social Sciences

Business and Economics – Social Enterprises – How they help communities, often with poor health. Research teenage obesity and how to reduce this within the Borough of Trafford.

Modern Foreign Languages

Computing

Music – Safety looked at through extra-curricular clubs and well -being – e.g. health for performing and looking after voices.

Art

Drama

Design Technology – Feature in Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 Food and Nutrition:

Year 7: Eat well guide, food groups and nutritional guidelines for different types of people.

Year 8 Topics above revisited briefly with a focus on balanced diets.

Key Stage 4: Eat well guide, food groups, balanced diets, portion control, food choices/intolerances and nutritional guidelines for different types of people covered in more detail.

PE